Women’s Prize Longlist Predictions

The Women’s Prize for Fiction (formerly the Bailey’s prize) is one of my favourites, so I’m looking forward to the longlist being announced on 8 March.  Here are my predictions.

Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

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I loved this. Eleanor is a singular character, sympathetic even though she is tactless and anti-social. Her weekends spent drinking vodka alone in her flat are sad and cast light on loneliness, something we can all relate to on some level. I expected a bleak story (and there is one) but it’s also drily funny and I laughed out loud often. Raymond and his mother are too perfect, and her mother too evil, but it still rang true.

The Mermaid and Mrs Hancock by Imogen Hermes Gower

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This lived up to the hype. I was drawn in immediately to 18th century London: Mr Hancock anxiously awaiting his ship and famed courtesan Angelica Neal trying to live independently. Beautifully written (but doesn’t feel overwritten); Gowar used to work in museums and her descriptions of objects and materials give texture to the story.  She also finds the comical side. It’s not too supernatural despite the mermaid, although I found the second half less convincing than the first. A wonderful debut.

Little Fires Everywhere by Celeste Ng

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There is a lot of heart and soul in this book. Good portrayal of privileged and troubled teens, white-bread parents, artist Mia with daughter Pearl and the town of Shaker Heights (suburbia on steroids). Mystery surrounds Mia and an adoption dispute affects them all. It felt contrived at times, Mia too saintly, Mrs Richardson too brittle & overall I thought it tried to do too much. Points of view changed so I didn’t become attached to any one character.  Reese Witherspoon and Kerry Washington are adapting this for television – I think it will be fabulous on screen.

Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

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Extremely good.  A re-telling of Antigone set in contemporary London, the sister is the story’s hero. Her brother is a jihadist – I wanted to empathise with him more, but even so, Shamsie succeeds in putting the reader in this family’s shoes: I haven’t read anything like it (Orhan Pamuk perhaps).  Engaging writing and has the high drama of Greek tragedy.  It grew on me as it went on and ended strongly.  Recommended.

Tin Man by Sarah Winman

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This left me a little bit broken. I resisted the sentimentality at first, but the characters Ellis, Michael and Anne drew me in and I could not put it down. A story of friends grappling with love in Oxford and London, told with great care, truth and occasional humour. Incredibly moving throughout. The scenes of neighbours and friends helping each other through tough times (death; the AIDS crisis) were simply told, but heart-warming.  This is a refined, accomplished work. I like the economy of language and how deftly Sarah Winman moves between scenes and characters. Less is more, things are left unsaid, but she is careful to show us the good side of people. I appreciated this optimism in a book with so much sadness tugging at its heart!

Anything is Possible by Elizabeth Strout

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I loved these stories, based in the same town and whose characters are loosely connected. It’s comforting meeting characters more than once, and the gentle atmosphere despite the dark subjects. The spare prose is beautifully restrained. And while town life moves slowly, the stories are vivid and propel you forward. Family, loneliness and redemption are explored, with heartfelt characters: flawed, overweight, creepy, but she treats them with compassion.

Winter by Ali Smith

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The second in Ali Smith’s series of seasonal books.  The first, Autumn, is on my shelves and will be my next read I think.  And then I’m very much looking forward to Winter – everyone is raving about it so I have no doubt it will make the long-list.

Sight by Jessie Greengrass

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This is my current read.  It’s exquisite so far, with lyrical but precise sentences that remind me of Virginia Woolf.  Max Porter has compared it to Shirley Hazzard (one of my favourite authors) and it has a similar, careful beauty and intelligence that feeds your mind as you read.  Loving it.  Eric from Lonesome Reader has tipped this to win the Booker prize so we shall see!

Manhattan Beach by Jennifer Egan

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This is on my shelf to read.  I’m including it on the strength of A Visit From the Goon Squad, Jennifer Egan’s earlier book which I absolutely loved.

Fire Sermon by Jamie Quatro

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The story of a woman’s crisis in her marriage and faith, this sounds intense.  But it’s getting some high praise so I’ll be intrigued to see if it makes the long-list.

How many do you think I’ll get right? I’d love to hear your predictions.

Happy International Women’s Day!










Top Holiday Reads

I’ve had some friends ask me for book recommendations for the holidays, so here are my top summer reads.


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The Trauma Cleaner by Sarah Krassnostein

A true story I can’t stop thinking about.  I noticed that Imprints and Matilda Books’ booksellers rated this among their best books of 2017.  It’s beautifully written and unlike anything else you’ll read.  Extraordinary.

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Mythos by Stephen Fry

I’m currently listening to and loving this as an audiobook, narrated by Stephen Fry. I always regretted not studying Greek mythology at school (especially now that I’ve married a Greek!) but now I’m glad I didn’t.  There is no more fun way to learn these stories: this book – especially read aloud in Stephen Fry’s inimitable way – is a joy.  Highly recommended and apart from the odd fruity bit, suitable for all the family (from around age 11 or 12).

Crime (always good for beach reading!)

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Still Life, Chief Inspector Gamache series (book 1) by Louise Penny

Cosy crime set in Quebec.  I love her diverse characters and the comfort factor.  Dead Cold is also great and I’m keen to read more from the series.

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Force of Nature (Aaron Falk book 2) by Jane Harper

Rural Australian crime, apparently even better than The Dry, which I enjoyed and has been taking the UK by storm recently.

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An Isolated Incident by Emily Maguire

More (literary) rural Australian crime, shortlisted for the Miles Franklin award and Stella prize 2017.  I highly recommend this for its en pointe writing and feminist sensibility.

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The Lying Game by Ruth Ware

A good page-turner a la Agatha Christie meets The Girl on the Train, this is being adapted for film and would be a perfect beach read.  I loved Ruth Ware’s first book, In a Dark Dark Wood, and The Woman in Cabin Ten is also on my TBR.

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The Liar (Eddie Flynn, book 3) by Steve Cavanagh

This is on my wish-list, after I read and loved The Defence and The Plea.  Intelligent, pacy legal thrillers set in New York, by Irish author Steve Cavanagh.  I discovered him after listening to his podcast with Luca Veste, Two Crime Writers and a Microphone (very funny, I recommend).

Buzzy Books

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Lincoln in the Bardo by George Saunders

Might be my book of the year.  I absolutely loved it.  So worthy of its Booker prize win.  I heard Annabel Crabb and Leigh Sales say on Chat 10 Looks 3 that they could not get into this, so if you struggle I highly recommend his short story collection Tenth of December.   I just finished it and was blown away. The man is a genius (but an approachable, funny, warm and engaging one).

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Little Fires Everywhere by Celese Ng

I found this a bit contrived but it’s interesting and discussion worthy, and is being adapted for screen by Reese Witherspoon.

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Home Fire by Kamila Shamsie

A re-telling of Antigone set in contemporary London.  Very current, well-written and with Muslim characters and point of view, I don’t think there are enough books like this.  Kamila Shamsie is also an excellent speaker and is coming to Adelaide Writers’ Week in March.

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Tin Man by Sarah Winman

This has been generating much buzz in the UK.  I found it sentimental at first but I was quickly drawn in.  Heart-breaking.  Sarah Winman is coming to Adelaide Writers’ Week too (as are Sarah Krassnostein and Louise Penny – it will be a big week).

What have you packed in your suitcase?

I’ve just been given Autumn by Ali Smith (much anticipated, and overdue as her next one Winter is out now) and Beautiful Animals by Lawrence Osborne, set on the Greek island of Hydra.  Both are definitely coming with me to the beach!